Mayflower in Rotherhithe

Rotherhithe has a long history with the sea and sailing, from the early trading days, to being the London home port of the Mayflower ship.  The very name Rotherhithe is thought to derive from the Anglo-Saxon 'Rethra' meaing a sailor and 'Hythe' meaning landing place.

Our two hour long Mayflower in Rotherhithe walk takes us to a pub where Captiain Jones is said to have hired his crew, another from where the settlers boarded the Mayflower, and even the burial grounds of Captain Christopher Jones.  There is a church and school from the days of the Pilgrims and memorials built to commemorate those brave souls of the past. We will end the tour in time for you to sample an ale and have lunch or an afternoon meal in one of the pubs we have seen on our walk.

The Mayflower public house was named after the ship that carried the Pilgrim Fathers.  It is beleived that Captain Jones docked the Mayflower at this spot to avoid paying commercial dock fees. The pub has many references to the Mayflower Pilgrims and captain Christopher Jones, including the passenger list.

Mayflower Descendants can sign the descendants visitors book. The pub is also the only pub in...

The statue, 'Sunbeam Weekly and the Pilgrim’s Pocket' stands on the walkway at Cumberland Wharf. The work is by Peter McClean, depicting a newsboy in 1930’s dress, reading a copy of the newspaper telling the story of The Mayflower and all that has happened in America since those days. The pilgrim is reading the paper over the boy’s shoulder, looking astonished at how the world has developed since...

The Rotherhithe Free School, founded by Peter Hills and Robert Bell in 1613 to educate the sons of seafarers in the days of the Pilgrims. Still displaying a pair of weathered figures of schoolchildren, the attractive schoolhouse of 1797 was vacated in 1939 yet the school may still be found close by in Salter Road.  The Mayflower pub, the church and the schoolhouse define the centre of the former v...

A church has existed on this site since at least 1282. In 1710 the parishioners collected subscriptions and local craftsmen turned their hands and feet to church building. The present church, was built in completed in 1715, to a design by John James, a leading architect of the times and an associate of Sir Christopher Wren.  However, there was not sufficient money to complete the church, and the t...

Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s father Marc began the tunnel with his teenage son, who later became resident engineer. It is the only project that father and son worked on together, and Isambard’s first. The Thames Tunnel opened in 1843 and is the first underwater tunnel in the world – and the birthplace of the modern metro system.

The Brunel Museum commemorates Isambard Kingdom Brunel's first and last p...

Rotherhithe has always has close trading links with Scandanavia. There are three churches within this small area, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish. We can see two of them.

There has been a Norwegian church in London since the late 17th century. The current church building, St Olav's, was consecrated in 1927, on a foundation stone laid the previous year by Prince Olav who would become King Olav V of N...

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