Mayflower 400

The full Mayflower heritage walk takes about six hours including lunch and entrance into many local sites.  This is the official and complete Mayflower 400 tour where we will and get inside many of the buildings and attractions.  This is the only tour which has been approved by the local history and tourist groups.  We will try to discover the London of the Pilgrims.  What was life like for ordinary people in those days?  Why were they driven to leave their home country and set sail for a new world and new life?  We will see how the area has changed over the last 400 years, but still retains links to it's past.

Our story begins in Rotherhithe, where the walk takes us past and into the Mayflower pub, the churchyard where Captain Christopher Jones is buried, a church and school from the days of the Pilgrims and memorials built to commemorate those brave souls of the past.  We will stop for lunch and ale at a local pub.  We will then move on to Bankside where we will see a prison where separatists were jailed, recreations of the Globe theatre of William Shakespeare and of a Tudor sailing ship.  The walk also brings us up to date showing later connections with the sea, sailing and water.  We will see the first tunnel to be built under a river, churches for Scandanavian sailors and their families, a period costume workshop and much, much more.

The Mayflower public house was named after the ship that carried the Pilgrim Fathers.  It is beleived that Captain Jones docked the Mayflower at this spot to avoid paying commercial dock fees. The pub has many references to the Mayflower Pilgrims and captain Christopher Jones, including the passenger list.

Mayflower Descendants can sign the descendants visitors book. The pub is also the only pub in...

The statue, 'Sunbeam Weekly and the Pilgrim’s Pocket' stands on the walkway at Cumberland Wharf. The work is by Peter McClean, depicting a newsboy in 1930’s dress, reading a copy of the newspaper telling the story of The Mayflower and all that has happened in America since those days. The pilgrim is reading the paper over the boy’s shoulder, looking astonished at how the world has developed since...

The Rotherhithe Free School, founded by Peter Hills and Robert Bell in 1613 to educate the sons of seafarers in the days of the Pilgrims. Still displaying a pair of weathered figures of schoolchildren, the attractive schoolhouse of 1797 was vacated in 1939 yet the school may still be found close by in Salter Road.  The Mayflower pub, the church and the schoolhouse define the centre of the former v...

A church has existed on this site since at least 1282. In 1710 the parishioners collected subscriptions and local craftsmen turned their hands and feet to church building. The present church, was built in completed in 1715, to a design by John James, a leading architect of the times and an associate of Sir Christopher Wren.  However, there was not sufficient money to complete the church, and the t...

Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s father Marc began the tunnel with his teenage son, who later became resident engineer. It is the only project that father and son worked on together, and Isambard’s first. The Thames Tunnel opened in 1843 and is the first underwater tunnel in the world – and the birthplace of the modern metro system.

The Brunel Museum commemorates Isambard Kingdom Brunel's first and last p...

Rotherhithe has always has close trading links with Scandanavia. There are three churches within this small area, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish. We can see two of them.

There has been a Norwegian church in London since the late 17th century. The current church building, St Olav's, was consecrated in 1927, on a foundation stone laid the previous year by Prince Olav who would become King Olav V of N...

The Clink was a prison in Southwark, which operated from the 1144 until 1780. It was possibly the oldest men's prison and probably the oldest women's prison in England. The prison served as the private gaol of an area owned by the Bishop of Winchester.  It held a variety of offenders: debtors, heretics, drunks and harlots, catholics accused of attempting to overhrow the crown, and most importantly...

In 1577, Francis Drake and his crew set sail from Plymouth aiming to be the first Englishmen to sail aound the world.  At that time the Spanish, led by Phillip II, had been plotting to removed the English Queen Elizabeth I from the thrown in favour of her cousin Mary, Queen of Scots. Spain had established territories in South America and built a strong navy to protect their nations lucrative trade...

Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London, with a market on the site dating back to at least the 12th century.

The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoine...

The Globe Theatre is a reconstruction of an Elizabethan playhouse associated with William Shakespeare, on the south bank of the River Thames. The new building stands only a few hundred yards from the original site.  The original theatre was built in 1599, destroyed by fire in 1613, rebuilt in 1614, and then demolished in 1644.

The rebuilding of the iconic building stems from the founding of the Sha...

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